Deployment Diary: Damage in the Old Neighborhood

I work for a disaster relief organization, but until today I had never seen a disaster in a place that I once considered home. Belmar, N.J. is a shore town about 90 minutes south of New York.  It’s wonderfully quiet in the winter and way too busy in the summer.  I used to live along Ocean Avenue, in the first apartment building across from the boardwalk.

Today, I was in a car surveying damage when I realized that we had driven into my old neighborhood.   There were more trees cut in half and uprooted than I could count. Roads were closed. Sand had worked its way off the

The boardwalk in Belmar, N.J. was destroyed by Superstorm Sandy and pieces of it were strewn about the neighborhood.

beach and covered the street like snow. Light poles were tilted over and bent at odd angles. A lake near the ocean had flooded and in some places there was still a few feet of water on the ground. It was very surreal and then it became even more so.

The driver unknowingly pulled to a stop in front of my old building.  The building itself is still standing, but sand from the beach across the street had formed a berm about five feet high on the front lawn. Debris was everywhere. Large planks from what used to be the boardwalk were strewn about. The boardwalk itself was completely gone. We saw pieces of it a few blocks inland.

I spoke with two people who live there – one of whom actually lives in my old apartment. He said they’re cold, uncomfortable and still have more than a foot of water in the basement. They’ve set up a grill in the parking lot and are sitting by it to cook and in an attempt to stay warm. I also met a lady who was in tears.  She said that they can’t get any information because they’ve been without power for so long that the batteries in their radios and flashlights are dead. She asked for help. When I told her it was on the way, she was so grateful that she almost cried again.

Some of my happiest memories are from that neighborhood. I still can’t quite believe what’s happened to it. And, as bad as the damage is, it’s nothing compared to some other areas.  But the Red Cross is helping, in New Jersey and across the east coast. We’ve deployed mobile kitchens that can cook nearly 200,000 meals each day, 230 response vehicles and 3,300 disaster workers.  Even more help is on the way, but we can’t do it alone.

The American Red Cross isn’t a government agency and we provide all of our disaster assistance free of charge. Superstorm Sandy was very large and our response to it will be quite costly.  Please consider helping our efforts by visiting RedCross.org, calling 1-800-RED-CROSS or texting REDCROSS to 90999 to make a one-time $10 contribution.

Advertisements

One thought on “Deployment Diary: Damage in the Old Neighborhood

  1. Daphne,
    Heard you on the radio tonight. Great job, very moving. I work in NJ during the baseball season each year. Thank you for your efforts and best of luck.
    Tom in Ohio

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s